Voters Narrowly Favor Law Allowing Crime Victims to Sue Sanctuary Cities

Voters still aren’t thrilled with the idea of living in a community that protects illegal immigrants from federal authorities. But they support only narrowly a law that would allow victims of crimes by those illegal immigrants to sue sanctuary communities.

Just 36% of Likely U.S. Voters favor the community they live in declaring itself a sanctuary for illegal immigrants. A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 49% are opposed to living in a sanctuary community, while 14% are undecided.

Voters Narrowly Favor Law Allowing Crime Victims to Sue Sanctuary Cities

Voters still aren’t thrilled with the idea of living in a community that protects illegal immigrants from federal authorities. But they support only narrowly a law that would allow victims of crimes by those illegal immigrants to sue sanctuary communities. Just 36% of Likely U.S.

More than 6 in 10 Americans say they feel better off after first 3 years of Trump, poll finds

More than 6 in 10 Americans say they feel better off after first 3 years of Trump, poll finds

WASHINGTON – A recent Gallup poll has some encouraging news for President Donald Trump as his battle for reelection heats up: more than six in 10 Americans say they are better off than they were three years ago when he took office, and about the same number credit him for the improvement.

Voters Still Want Budget Cuts, With An Eye on Entitlements

Voters agree the $4 trillion-plus the federal government now spends annually is too much and favor budget cuts, especially in entitlement programs. But most also consider it highly unlikely that spending cuts will occur.

The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 61% of Likely U.S. Voters think there is too much federal government spending. Only 10% say there’s too little, while 20% believe the level of spending is about right.

Voters Still Want Budget Cuts, With An Eye on Entitlements

Voters agree the $4 trillion-plus the federal government now spends annually is too much and favor budget cuts, especially in entitlement programs. But most also consider it highly unlikely that spending cuts will occur. The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 61% of Likely U.S.

39% of Republicans Want to Expel Romney from GOP; 18% Undecided

Mitt Romney was the only Republican senator who voted guilty last week on one of the impeachment counts brought against President Trump by House Democrats. Many Republicans were furious at Romney, and a sizable number of GOP voters are ready to throw him out of the party.

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 39% of Likely Republican Voters think Romney should be expelled from the Republican Party. Only slightly more (43%) disagree, while nearly one-in-five (18%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

Sixty-four percent (64%) of Republicans now have an unfavorable opinion of the man who was the GOP presidential nominee in 2012, with 38% who view him Very Unfavorably. That compares to 47% and 29% respectively last October. Thirty percent (30%) still share a favorable view of the Utah senator, down from 41% four months ago, including 17% with a Very Favorable one.

Democrats, however, have a new respect for Romney. Sixty percent (60%) now regard him favorably, up from 47% last fall. Unaffiliated voters are closely divided.

39% of Republicans Want to Expel Romney from GOP; 18% Undecided

Mitt Romney was the only Republican senator who voted guilty last week on one of the impeachment counts brought against President Trump by House Democrats. Many Republicans were furious at Romney, and a sizable number of GOP voters are ready to throw him out of the party.

Health Care, Economy Top Voter Concerns This Election Year

Health care and the economy dominate voter concerns as America begins the slow formal crawl to the next presidential election.

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 23% of Likely U.S. Voters identify health care as the most important issue to their vote in the upcoming elections. The economy is a close second with 21% who list it as their top voting concern.

For 15%, taxes and spending are most important, while 13% are most concerned with illegal immigration. Next is climate change, the most important voting issue for 11%, followed by President Trump’s impeachment (6%) and national security (5%). Another five percent (5%) rate something else as most important.

Health Care, Economy Top Voter Concerns This Election Year

Health care and the economy dominate voter concerns as America begins the slow formal crawl to the next presidential election. A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 23% of Likely U.S. Voters identify health care as the most important issue to their vote in the upcoming elections.

America’s Best Days: Voters See A Stronger America, Optimistic About Future

Voters tend to believe President Trump has made America stronger and remain more optimistic about the nation’s future than they have been in years.

Forty-six percent (46%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the United States has become a stronger nation since Trump’s election, according to the latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey. Forty-one percent (41%) say he’s made the nation weaker, while 10% say the country is about the same. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

Fifty percent (50%) think America’s best days are in the future, down slightly from last April’s all-time high of 54%,but still higher than it has been in regular surveying since 2006. Only 30% say the country’s best days are in the past. Twenty percent (20%) are undecided.

In most surveys since November 2006, the number of voters who felt America’s best days were in the future ran in the mid- to upper 30s. As recently as May 2017, 52% thought America’s best days were in the past.

America’s Best Days

Voters See A Stronger America, Optimistic About Future Voters tend to believe President Trump has made America stronger and remain more optimistic about the nation’s future than they have been in years. Forty-six percent (46%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the United States has become a stronger nation since Trump’s election, according to the latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey.

Few Minds Have Been Changed by Senate Impeachment Trial

The Senate impeachment trial of President Trump may have dominated the headlines, but it has had little impact on perhaps the most important jury, America’s voters.

The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that just 10% of Likely U.S. Voters say they have changed their opinion about Trump’s impeachment since the trial in the Senate began. Eighty-four percent (84%) have not. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

Seven percent (7%) of Democrats say they have changed their opinion about the impeachment, compared to 12% of both Republicans and voters not affiliated with either major political party.

Seventy-seven percent (77%) of all voters say they have closely followed the Senate impeachment trial of the president, but only 41% have followed Very Closely. Among those who have followed Very Closely, 15% say they have changed their opinion about Trump’s impeachment.

Few Minds Have Been Changed by Senate Impeachment Trial

The Senate impeachment trial of President Trump may have dominated the headlines, but it has had little impact on perhaps the most important jury, America’s voters. The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that just 10% of Likely U.S.

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